3 Facts about Antibiotics

Antibiotics have allowed humans to combat the bacterial infections that claimed so many lives before. Unfortunately, we could be at risk of losing this incredible resource due to antibiotic resistance. Bacteria evolve and become better adapted at surviving these drugs on which we have relied for so long.

These drug-resistant bacteria are known as "superbugs," the most well-known of which is methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). About 15 percent of patients who contract MRSA will end up dying from the infection. As quickly as antibiotics are developed, bacteria begin to find a way to reduce their effectiveness. As more and more bacterial species become resistant to treatment, humanity could soon be entering a post-antibiotic era, putting us back in a time before Fleming's history-changing discovery.

Antibiotics have allowed humans to combat the bacterial infections that claimed so many lives before. Unfortunately, we could be at risk of losing this incredible resource due to antibiotic resistance. Bacteria evolve and become better adapted at surviving these drugs on which we have relied for so long.

These drug-resistant bacteria are known as "superbugs," the most well-known of which is methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). About 15 percent of patients who contract MRSA will end up dying from the infection. As quickly as antibiotics are developed, bacteria begin to find a way to reduce their effectiveness. As more and more bacterial species become resistant to treatment, humanity could soon be entering a post-antibiotic era, putting us back in a time before Fleming's history-changing discovery.

Antibiotics have allowed humans to combat the bacterial infections that claimed so many lives before. Unfortunately, we could be at risk of losing this incredible resource due to antibiotic resistance. Bacteria evolve and become better adapted at surviving these drugs on which we have relied for so long.

These drug-resistant bacteria are known as "superbugs," the most well-known of which is methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). About 15 percent of patients who contract MRSA will end up dying from the infection. As quickly as antibiotics are developed, bacteria begin to find a way to reduce their effectiveness. As more and more bacterial species become resistant to treatment, humanity could soon be entering a post-antibiotic era, putting us back in a time before Fleming's history-changing discovery.

1. Antibiotics only work to fight bacteria, not viruses or fungi.

As the name indicates, antibiotics are compounds that fight bacterial infections. This means that they don't work on illnesses caused by viruses, such as the cold or flu. While some people may request these drugs when they're sick, any good doctor will refuse and prescribe an appropriate medication, but it's better to not even ask in the first place.

Antibiotics are an essential part of modern medicine and they are the only cure for numerous infectious diseases. Since the discovery of penicillin in the 1940s, scientists from many countries have developed more than 150 different antibiotics to help stop the spread of infections. The ability of antibiotics to cure infectious diseases that were previously fatal has led to the notion that they are ‘miracle drugs’. And that they posess ‘powers’ widely exceeding those which can be attributed to their actual pharmacological properties. They have saved millions of lives, however, there are some interesting facts to adhere upon, about them. Here are three of them:

 

1. Antibiotics only work to fight bacteria, not virus or fungi - as the name indicates, antiobiotics are compounds which fight bacterial infections. Which means they dont work on illnesses caused by viruses, such as cold or flu.

2. Antibiotics are harmful for the environment - antibacterial soaps don't really provide any tangible benefits to making hands cleaner, additionally, they are harmful to the environment. These compounds aren't removed from the wastewater facilities, meaning they get expelled back into the environment and become part of the water cycle.

3. Largest Consumers are Livestock: 80% of antibiotics are given to livestock (under factory-farmed circumstances). The cramped living conditions are stressful to the animals, putting them at the risk of getting sick. 

3. The largest consumers of antibiotics are livestock.

A staggering 80 percent of all antibiotics administered are given to factory-farmed animals. The cramped living conditions are stressful to the animals, putting them at increased risk of getting sick. However, much of the medicine is given to animals that aren't even sick yet. This unnecessary practice does nothing but increase resistance to medication.

hese compounds aren't removed from the water in wastewater treatment facilities, meaning they get released back into the environment and become part of the water cycle. This has terrible implications for the marine life living near these areas, as they are subjected to these superbugs.
As the name indicates, antibiotics are compounds that fight bacterial infections. This means that they don't work on illnesses caused by viruses, such as the cold or flu. While some people may request these drugs when they're sick, any good doctor will refuse and prescribe an appropriate medication, but it's better to not even ask in the first place.